Problems of Practice

This week in CEP812, we started the course by looking at problems of practice in education.  We learned that there are well-structured, ill-structured (or complex) and wicked problems.  We looked at our some of our own problems of practice and identified some tools that could help us overcome our problems.  The video below is a screencast describing my problem of practice as a teacher-librarian and the tool I discovered to help me.

I welcome any feedback in the comments section below.

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2 thoughts on “Problems of Practice

  1. Hi Tanya. What a great way of teaching research skills! I had never thought of using google custom search in the classroom before. It sounds very useful because it would ensure both a safe and focused method of research for students. Working in a school for young children, I’ve always faced the dilemma of encouraging students to independently make use of the extensive resources online, but at the same time making sure their use of the internet is done in a safe and appropriate manner. This seems to be like the ideal solution. I especially like how the custom search allows you to either research a website or a certain topic. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. I think Google Custom Search is a brilliant way to impose an appropriate limit on student research options. I assume you think of this issue as an ill-structured problem, yes? With so many students unaware of how to properly search (hard to believe for those of us who witnessed the birth and explosion of the search engine in the 90s; could we imagine anyone would take this miracle for granted as an educational tool?), they often need direction to take away the shifting contexts and variables which search engines provide. This way, they are still in control of the search (great for autonomy), but their focus is narrowed in a way that the educator intends.

    Also, Tanya – you used Prezi BRILLIANTLY. Please make more videos – they could be very helpful for teachers seeking guidance on research projects. Thanks, Dan.

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